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Rohini Pande
Harvard Kennedy School
Rohini_Pande@harvard.edu
Rohini Pande is an economist, the Mohammed Kamal Professor of Public Policy, Area Chair for Political and Economic Development, Co-Director of Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD) and Director of Governance Innovations for Sustainable Development Group at Harvard Kennedy School, Harvard University. She is an Executive Committee member of the Bureau for Research on Economic Development (BREAD), co-chairs the Political Economy and Government Group at Jameel Poverty Action Lab (JPAL) and is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). Her research examines how the design of democratic institutions and government regulation affects policy outcomes and citizen well-being, especially in South Asia. Her work emphasises the use of real-world evidence to test economic models, often through large-scale field experiments in developing countries. She has worked extensively on the design and impact of electoral accountability and transparency initiatives, financial access initiatives and environmental regulation in low-income settings. Current projects include examinations of: information disclosures via politician report-cards; health and economic impacts of microfinance; the efficacy of environmental regulations in India; and the costs and benefits of an emissions trading market in India. Her research has been funded by National Science Foundation and private foundations, and has been published in several journals including the American Economic Review, Quarterly Journal of Economics and Science. Pande received a Ph.D. in economics from London School of Economics, a M.A. in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from Oxford University and a B.A. in economics from Delhi University.

Rohini Pande also serves as the faculty co-chair of a week-long executive education programme, "Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice," aimed primarily at professionals involved in the design and regulation of financial products and services for low-income populations.

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Articles By Rohini Pande
Constructing housing for the poor without destroying their communities
Posted On: 24 Mar 2017


The Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana aims to achieve housing for all by 2022. However, vacancy of 23% was reported last year in urban housing built under the programme. In this article, Rohini Pande, contends that take-up can be increased if policies are designed in a way that allows the intended beneficiaries to preserve their social networks when they relocate.
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Getting India´s women into the workforce: Time for a smart approach
Posted On: 10 Mar 2017

Topics:   Gender , Jobs
Tags:  

In this article, Rohini Pande, the Mohammed Kamal Professor of Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School, contends that raising India’s stubbornly low rate of female labour force participation will require behavioural interventions that address social norms.

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Asking the right question to get the right policy
Posted On: 04 Apr 2016

Topics:   Political Economy
Tags:   MNREGA , data

There is consensus in the development community on the importance of bridging the gap between researchers and practitioners; however, misaligned incentives underlie this gap. In this article, Pande, Moore and Dodge of Harvard Kennedy School, explain how bringing policymakers together with researchers to work more iteratively ensured that data from MNREGS - the world’s largest public works programme - became accessible and relevant to those who use it.
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What is causing Delhi’s air pollution?
Posted On: 15 Feb 2016

Topics:   Environment

Several policies aimed at reducing Delhi’s air pollution have been implemented this winter, but what remains unclear is where the pollution comes from. This column takes stock of what we know about pollution sources and the portion contributed by each. It contends that good information systems are required to turn the critical convergence of public concern, policymaker attention, and academic contribution into a smart policy response.
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The political economy of data
Posted On: 21 Aug 2015

Topics:   Political Economy
Tags:   data

Recent experiences, especially from Scandinavian countries, show that opening administrative data sources can substantially improve public policymaking. In this article, Pande and Blum contend that while investment in data infrastructure is needed to produce and use statistics, the decision to collect and open data also depends on political economy considerations. Such forces are particularly strong in India and pose a major constraint on effective policy reform.
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Should the less educated be barred from village council elections?
Posted On: 23 Feb 2015


In December 2014, the state government of Rajasthan issued an executive order barring citizens with less than eight years of formal education from running for village council chief elections in all but tribal areas. In this article, Rohini Pande, Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University, contends that this will discriminate against able leaders who have been denied schooling because of gender, poverty or caste.
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Keeping women safe
Posted On: 24 Dec 2014

Topics:   Gender

Since the December 2012 rape incident in Delhi, numerous policies have been proposed to stop the “war on women”. In this article, Rohini Pande discusses economic research, including her own, on the social, legal and financial forces that cause individuals, families and the society to undervalue women and harm them. Such an understanding can help determine whether a policy may succeed, or create perverse incentives.
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The youngest are hungriest
Posted On: 17 Sep 2014

Topics:   Health , Gender

Babies born in India are more likely to be stunted than those in sub-Saharan Africa, even though the former are better off on average. This column examines how the India-Africa height gap varies by birth order within the family and finds that it begins with the second-born and becomes more pronounced with each subsequent baby. Favouritism toward firstborn sons in India explains this trend.
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