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Shabana Mitra
Indian Insitute of Management Bangalore
shabana@iimb.ernet.in
Shabana Mitra is an Assistant Professor at the Centre for Public Policy, Indian Institute of Management Bangalore (IIMB). Her main research interests are political economy implications of public policies on gender and caste-based inequalities in the Indian context. Prior to joining IIMB, she has worked at the World Bank and the Peace Research Institute, Oslo, Norway. She obtained her PhD in Economics from Vanderbilt University in 2011.
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Articles By Shabana Mitra
Consumption spikes and election days
Posted On: 20 Apr 2017

Topics:   Political Economy

There is ample anecdotal evidence on political parties bribing voters with cash or consumption goods prior to elections, in India and other developing countries. However, there is an expected lack of hard evidence on the extent and form of vote-buying. Using data from Indian states, this column analyses consumption patterns of households around elections, and finds a spike for some items just before elections.
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Politician’s pain is poor man’s gain: Income distribution in close-election constituencies
Posted On: 09 Nov 2016

Tags:   democracy

Studies have highlighted the role of electoral competition in directing the flow of public funds. Analysing data from India, this column finds lower income inequality and polarisation in tightly contested constituencies, implying that the poor gain more from electoral competition relative to the rich.
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